Certain data analytics applications are capable of developing play strategies for sports.
Sports communities using data analytics

Professional sports franchises and even some members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association are turning to data analytics tools in order to better predict the outcome of competitions. Database administration services employed by these organizations often monitor programs capable of developing training programs and game plans based on algorithmic conclusions. 

Educators taking advantage of the technology 
According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the university's annual Sloan Sports Analytics Conference has positioned the school as a crucial part of the growing sports analytics industry. The two-day event typically attracts a sold-out audience consisting of almost 3,000 attendees, about 10 percent of them owners, players and representatives from some of the most reputable professional teams in the United States and Europe. 

Daryl Morey, a 2000 MIT graduate and managing director of basketball operations for the Houston Rockets, stated that many sports organizations in the U.S. have hired database support services to manage a working infrastructure for their analytics applications. He told the source that teams are using the tools to develop in-game strategies as well as business plans. 

The article noted baseball's utilization of advanced metrics programs such as value over replacement player, a system created by Keith Woolner that simulates how much an athlete contributes to his or her team in comparison to a near-average stand-in teammate at the same position. 

Taking it to the next level 
Due to the amount of money invested in professional and even a few collegiate sports teams, new developments in analytics tools are sure to provide those organizations with more accurate, plentiful information. Lauren Brousell, a contributor to CIO, noted that remote DBA experts have regulated programs capable of replacing the judgment calls of baseball umpires, supplying fans with customized digital information and delivering real-time surveillance. 

The news source stated that technology vendors are trying to capitalize on the wearable technology market. Fitness trackers are becoming popular among everyday consumers, but sports teams are looking to take the next step. Athletic apparel company Adidas recently created devices players can attach to their jerseys. 

"Data from the device shows the coach who the top performers are and who needs rest,"  wrote. "It also provides real-time stats on each player, such as speed, heart rate and acceleration."

Some tools are being developed to show what will draw fans to sports venues. John Forese, senior vice president and general manager of Live Analytics, stated that knowing specifics like whether a person is interested in an opposing team coming to town can be valuable intelligence for franchises. 

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