IT security threats evolve and persist
IT security threats evolve and persist

It is a constant challenge for businesses to address all of their IT security concerns. Even if a company network is secure, there is always a chance that a database has already been hacked, according to a recent report from Forbes. The FBI notifies several hundred companies and organizations every year to inform them that they have been the victims of cybercrimes or other intrusions.

Forbes stated that most of these companies were unaware that there had been a breach of any kind, a problem that the news source attributed to a lack of knowledge on the part of company CEOs. When upper management knows the details of their security strategy, businesses can defend themselves against attacks proactively and know exactly when something has gone wrong.

Every attack happens for a reason
Hackers rarely attempt to stage a cyber attack without a compelling reason. Forbes listed the examples of why organizations might be targeted by an attacker. Other organizations might be after technology or competing companies might want to steal money and customer information. There is also the possibility of a data breach by a foreign government or a destructive attack from an activist organization.

According to a recent article from The Next Web, a relatively new industry buzzword has arisen in light of growing pressure for companies to increase their security: Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). With large amounts of assets and intellectual property at stake, organizations need to be extra cautious of attacks that involve remote control software designed to grant hackers continuous access to a company network or database.

The Next Web explained that traditional form of security such as firewalls and intrusion prevention systems are ineffective against APTs, and that companies need to find new ways of defending themselves in years to come.

IT Management