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Mobile device management is a two-sided battle

Securing the connections between mobile devices and company servers remains a challenge for in-house IT departments.

The rise of the Internet of Things and the bring-your-own-device phenomenon have shaped the way database administration specialists conduct mobile device management. Many of these professionals are employed by retailers using customer relationship management applications that collect and analyze data from smartphones, tablets and numerous other devices. This level of activity creates a web of connectivity that's difficult to manage and often necessitates expert surveillance. 

Managing the remote workplace 
Merchandisers are challenged with the task of effectively securing all mobile assets used by their employees. Many of these workers have access to sensitive corporate information, whether it be a product development files, customer loyalty account numbers or consumer payment data. According to CIO, some organizations lack the in-house IT resources to effectively manage the avenues through which intelligence flows from smartphones to servers. 

As a result, small and midsize businesses often outsource to remote database support services to gain a comprehensive overview of their BYOD operations. David Lingenfelter, an information security officer at Fiberlink, told the news source that the problem many SMBs face is that their employees are using their own individual mobile devices to access company information. Many large enterprises often provide their workers with such machines, so there's inherent surveillance over the connections they're making. 

Moving to the home front 
Small, medium and large retailers alike are continuing to use CRM, which provides these commodity-based businesses with specific information regarding individuals. IoT has launched the capabilities of these programs, delivering data from a wide variety of smart mechanisms such as cars, watches and even refrigerators. Information being funneled into company servers comes from remote devices, creating a unique kind of mobile device management for database administration services to employ. 

Frank Gillett, a contributor to InformationWeek, noted that many consumers are connecting numerous devices to a singular home-based network, providing merchandisers with a view of how a family or group of apartment mates interacts with the Web. In addition, routers and gateways are acting as defaults for making network-connected homes ubiquitous. 

"These devices bring the Internet to every room of the house, allowing smart gadgets with communications to replace their dumb processors," noted Gillett.

However, it's not as if the incoming information submitted by these networks can be thrown into a massive jumble. In order to provide security and organize the intelligence appropriately, remote DBA providers monitor the connections and organize the results into identifiable, actionable data. 

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